• piecesA Man in Pieces

    “. . . [I'm] struck again and again . . . by the pure unfathomable meaningfulness of the writing. I didn’t want the book to end.” — William Heyen

    “. . . ingenious . . . angles . . . . [Elder's] poetry is always moving, funny enough to make you cry, and sad enough to make you laugh.” — William Greenway

  • gilgamesh_slideGilgamesh at the Bellagio

    Gilgamesh at the Bellagio opens memorably as Karl Elder confronts the reader with his always-astonishing prosodic acrobatics, showcased this time in 26 deeply intelligent decasyllabic abecedarians. It ends with more of the same (but backwards!) in “Z Ain’t Just for Zabacedarium.” Glimmering in between is the title poem, which recreates, with sardonic humor and a perfect ear for the vernacular, aspects of society’s profound collective melancholia. A tour de force by a superlative American poet. –Marilyn L. Taylor, Contributing Editor

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